Moon Rocks | St. George, QLD

Ph: +61 7 4625 5146    emailimageEmail us

610 Bundoran Road
St. George 4487
QLD, Australia

Employment - Farm Safe

100% Australian, 100% Quality

An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure 10/08/2018

Knife Safety Tips

 

Sharp tool usage is common in our work place at the moment with Broccoli harvest and Broccoli Packing and of course Onion peeling

It is easy to make the mistake of thinking that they are completely safe to use. Potential hand injuries in the workplace can be all too common.

It is very important to follow safe knife handling procedures at all times when using a knife / Sharp tool.

 

When working with a knife or sharp tool in Moonrocks , a cut resistant glove that has been supplied to you must be worn on the opposite hand to what you are holding the knife sharp tool in, that way if your knife or sharp tool slips you can your hand some kind of protection.

 

Remember no Glove no Work. We want you to go home with all your digits.

 

Knife safety tips to consider:

 

  • Always use the correct knife for the job

 

  • knives work best when they're sharp. They are easier to operate and safer to use when sharp. Blunt knives can cause injury due to excessive pressure applied

 

  • Point the blade away from yourself when cutting. Make sure no body parts are in the cutting path.

 

  • Be certain that other people are at a safe distance before cutting.

 

  • When not in use, see that you store your knife or cutter in a safe location. make sure the blade is safely stored away.

 

  • Never discard loose blades in the garbage or leave them where they can injure an unsuspecting person.

 

  • Use knives and cutters for their intended purpose. Using your knife in a way in which they were not designed or on the wrong materials can damage the blade and cause injury to yourself or others.

 

  • If a knife is falling, even a safety knife, you risk injury by trying to stop it with your hand or foot. Let the knife fall to the ground rather than trying to grab it as it falls.

 

  • Do not toss a knife to someone. It is also recommended that you do not hand a knife directly to someone. Set down the knife and let the other person pick it up

 

  • Be alert and pay attention when you are using a knife.  Don’t get distracted or take your eyes off what you are doing

 

  • When carrying a knife always hold the point of the knife downwards

 

  • DO NOT RUN WITH A KNIFE OR SHARP TOOL

 

If you are unlucky and Cut yourself or someone else:

 

Please report to your first aider Lynda Myburgh and Brett Grayson in the sheds and for the paddock report to Justin Tydd and Troy Marsh immediately all accidents no matter how minor must be reported.

Chance takers are accident makers 30/07/2018

 

Forklifts

 

We’re serious about forking safety, and you should be too.

 

Forklifts are used to lift, stack and transfer loads in many workplaces. However, every year they continue to cause workplace deaths and injuries resulting in substantial financial and human costs for workers, industry and the community.

 

Even while travelling at very slow speeds, forklifts can potentially crush and severely injure pedestrians, tip over or lose its load.

 

Forklift safety is very important and Workers can protect themselves when they are working near forklifts by using their senses and common sense.

 

Pedestrians 

 

Pedestrians must learn to listen and look for warning signs that indicate a forklift is nearby so they can take steps to avoid the forklift. They should:

 

Listen for the sound of forklift horns. Forklift operators should sound the horn when approaching intersections, corners, blind spots, other forklifts, and areas with pedestrians.

 

Listen for the sound of backup alarms. Most forklifts have a backup alarm that sounds whenever the forklift is moving in reverse.

 

Listen for the sounds of the forklift engine. The engines of combustion forklifts will be louder when the forklift is traveling or when the forklift is raising a load. However, because electric forklifts are usually very quiet, listening for engine noise from them will not help.

 

Look for flashing lights,

 

Walking Safely near Forklifts

 

In order to maintain an awareness of where forklifts are, workers should:

 

 Avoid distractions when walking out where there is forklift traffic, including reading paperwork or talking with other pedestrians.

 

 Stop and look both ways before entering a forklift lane, crossing an aisle, walking up to a blind corner, or walking across an intersection where forklifts travel.

 

 Walk single file along the side of an aisle that has forklift traffic or keep to designated walking aisles.

 

DO NOT RUN IN FRONT OF FORKLIFTS!!!!

 

 If a pedestrian needs to approach a forklift driver to discuss something, he or she should:

 

Stay back from the forklift until the driver sees him or her

 

Wait for the driver to stop the forklift

 

 Approach the forklift after the driver motions him or her over.

 

 Keep their feet away from the forklift.

 

 Walk away before the driver moves the forklift, rather than standing next to the forklift and waiting for the driver to pull away.

 

 Keep your distance Fully loaded, a standard forklift and its load can have a combined weight of five or more tonnes. If you work near forklifts, you are equally at risk from being killed or seriously injured through being hit or crushed by the forklift itself, or being hit or crushed by the load the forklift is moving.

 

 You are most at risk of being hit by a forklift or its load if you are

 

walking alongside it

 

picking stock off a nearby shelf

 

walking in between it and a delivery vehicle

 

stepping in to its path,

 

 assisting with loading/unloading

 

 Be aware that a forklift operators field of vision is obscured by the mast and load – don’t assume they have seen you.

 

Forklift operators

 

Comply with the operating instructions.

 

 Use the forklift truck only for the purpose for which it was designed.

 

 IN SUMMARY

 

It’s important to remember that working safely in and around forklifts is everyone’s responsibility

 

Reminder of the Packing Shed Construction 18/06/2018

REMINDER OF RESTRICTED AREA DURING THE EXTENSION OF THE PACKING SHED

 

Exciting news we will be starting construction work on extending the packing shed from 06/06/2018 until further notice.

 

There will be very limited access to the cold rooms for our forklift drivers and no access for our packing shed and causal staff and only access to authorised personnel.

We will be removing line 2 for forklift drivers to access the front of the shed – to load our trucks. This means forklift drivers will have more access to the shed and will be driving through the shed. So, we need to be extra vigilant and listen out for those beeping horns and forklift drivers need to be extra vigilant for staff walking through the shed.

 

Please be VERY vigilant for construction crew during this time. There will be a lot of activity at the back of the shed (COLD ROOM SIDES) including more than usual heavy machinery driving around including back hoes and cranes trucks etc.

 

Please ensure you use the PPE that has provided to you. Please enter and exit the shed through the shed door as shown to you during your induction and not the front of back of shed.

 

Some examples of the hazards and Why you are strictly forbidden from accessing the construction area: 

 

  • changes to surface levels; 
  • excavations, holes and trenches
  • falling material and debris
  • plant and equipment
  • dust vapours noise;
  •  vibrations

Should you have any questions or concerns please do not hesitate to speak to your supervisors.

Packing Shed Under Construction 05/06/2018

EXTENSION OF THE PACKING SHED

 

Exciting news we will be starting construction work on extending the packing shed from 06/06/2018 until further notice.

 

There will be very limited access to the cold rooms for our forklift drivers and no access for our packing shed and causal staff and only access to authorised personnel.

We will be removing line 2 for forklift drivers to access the front of the shed – to load our trucks. This means forklift drivers will have more access to the shed and will be driving through the shed. So, we need to be extra vigilant and listen out for those beeping horns and forklift drivers need to be extra vigilant for staff walking through the shed.

 

Please be VERY vigilant for construction crew during this time. There will be a lot of activity at the back of the shed (COLD ROOM SIDES) including more than usual heavy machinery driving around including back hoes and cranes trucks etc.

 

Please ensure you use the PPE that has provided to you. Please enter and exit the shed through the shed door as shown to you during your induction and not the front of back of shed.

 

Some examples of the hazards and Why you are strictly forbidden from accessing the construction area: 

 

  • changes to surface levels; 
  • excavations, holes and trenches
  • falling material and debris
  • plant and equipment
  • dust vapours noise;
  •  vibrations

Should you have any questions or concerns please do not hesitate to speak to your supervisors.

 

Safety rules are your best tools 14/05/2018

The Dangers of Mobile Phones!!!

 

Distractions are one of the leading causes for accidents and injuries in the workplace, many of which involve mobile devices.

 

When people start paying attention to a text message or game, they stop paying attention to the task at hand, which can result in disaster in the form of an accident or worse.

 

Unfortunately, this is true for any type of work

 

  • Being distracted increases your chances of having a serious accident. It slows down your reaction times and puts you in danger of failing to see hazards such as dangerous machinery, emergency stops or all other potential hazards, including traffic and pedestrians around the sheds, inside the sheds, paddock

  • Anything that takes your mind or eyes off the job, or your hands off the wheel, not only compromises your safety, but that of everyone else

 

Moonrocks operates a No Personal Mobile phone policy .  Personal Mobile phones are strictly forbidden.

 

Personal Mobile phones are not allowed in the growing / packing handling / storage areas unless specified by your supervisor. Anyone caught using a personal mobile phone for personal use during working hours  will have disciplinary action taken against them.

 

 

DISTRACTED FORKLIFT OPERATOR SERIOUSLY INJURES CO-WORKER

 

Forklift operator Ramon Jamison discusses what happened the day he was distracted by texting and struck a co-worker.


“I usually keep my phone in my locker every morning, but my wife was having an ultrasound that morning and I wanted to know if we were having a little boy or a little girl, so I kept my phone with me,” says Ramon.

 

 “I was moving stacks of pallets in the storage yard when I heard the message alert go off,” he adds.

Ramon says he was so excited to find out that he didn’t even think about not checking his text. He looked down and had to focus on his phone for a moment to select and read the text.

 

“That’s when Ronnie suddenly walked in front of the forklift and I didn’t see him until I heard him shout,” he continues. “The thought of anyone walking in front of my forklift was the furthest thing from my mind.”

 

 What should have been one of the best days of his life ended up being one of the worst. Not only did Ramon lose his job for violating his company’s rules on cell phone use, his actions caused the death of a friend and a co-worker

 

 

 

MACHINE OPERATOR’S SPLIT-SECOND DECISION RESULTS IN TRAUMATIC INJURY

 

Machine operator Iris McMurray explains how her desire for instant access to information led to an instant injury as well.

 

“During lunch, my boyfriend and I were texting each other about our last-minute weekend trip to the beach. He was trying to find a nice hotel that still had a vacancy,” says Iris.

 

“We’re not supposed to take our phones into the production area, but everybody does it, so I figured it would be okay. Plus, I was eager to find out if he found a place to stay,” she adds.

 

Iris said she worked for a while and then noticed she had a text from her boyfriend concerning their hotel room.

 

It happened so fast! As I tried to reply, I somehow dropped the phone right into my machine,” she says. “My first reaction was to grab it before it got eaten by the machine, or worse yet, jam up the production line.” When Iris dropped her phone, she tried to grab it off the machine’s conveyor, but her hand was crushed when it was caught between the conveyor belt and the roller.

 

I’ll have to live with that split-second decision for the rest of my life. If I had just followed company policy, and just waited until my afternoon break. If I had just thought about how dangerous texting around that machine was. Now, every time I look at my hand, I wonder, what if?” Iris concludes.

 

Iris could have waited to correspond with her boyfriend; it would not have made any difference other than her eagerness to know the weekend plans. We’ve all heard the expression, “Curiosity killed the cat.” In this case, a desire for instant information injured Iris

 

 

Just because you have a smart phone it doesn’t mean it’s smart to text and drive 24/04/2018

Mobile Phones & Driving 

 

  • Mobile phones are a dangerous distraction

  • Being distracted increases your chances of having a serious accident. It slows down your reaction times and puts you in danger of failing to see potential hazards, including traffic and pedestrians

  • Anything that takes your mind or eyes off the road or your hands off the wheel, not only compromises your safety, but that of everyone else

 

 While driving or riding you CANNOT use your mobile phone for anything else, including:

 

  • Texting or audio texting

  • Emailing

  • Using social media

  • Taking photos

  • Video messaging

  • Holding your phone in any way (in hand, on lap, between shoulder and ear). Drivers are only allowed to hold a phone to pass it to a passenger.

 

Laws in All States of Australia in regards to Mobile phones and driving

 

Having a mobile phone in your hand while driving is illegal, even if you are stopped at traffic lights and traffic is non-existent. To use a mobile you need to either have a hands free kit or pull over.

 

NOTE: Drivers  under 25 years old are not allowed to use a mobile phone while driving at any time (including hands free) in all States except W.A.


Driving is a task that requires all of your attention in order to be safe. There is a lot of research showing that mobile phones distract people from other tasks. Queensland law provides rules that restrict the use of mobile phones while driving.

 

Can I use a mobile phone with the phone in my hand while driving?


No. Driving with a mobile phone in the driver’s hand is illegal. This includes, but is not limited to, making and receiving calls and any other function of the phone. You can be fined if your mobile phone is in your hand for any reason while you are driving.

 

Can I use a mobile phone that is in my hand while stopped at traffic lights or in a queue of congested traffic?


No. If you are stopped in traffic it is illegal for the driver to use a mobile phone that is held in his or her hand.

 

Can I stop on the side of the road to use my mobile phone?


Yes so long as you park legally.

 

What does ‘park legally’ mean?


To stop and stay in an area where there is no prohibition on stopping or parking. It is recommended that you secure the vehicle by applying parking brakes; put the automatic transmission into ‘park’ and turn off the ignition.

 

Are there other rules that apply to using phones while driving?


Even if you are using your phone hands free, if you drive erratically or are obviously distracted from the driving task, other rules may be contravened. For example, you may be guilty of driving while not having proper control of the vehicle or driving without due care and attention. Also, a mobile phone that is mounted in a hands-free mounting bracket on the windscreen must not obscure the driver’s view of the road.

 

What is the best road safety advice for the use of mobile phones while driving?


The link between driver distraction and increased crash risk has been demonstrated by a number of studies. The Queensland Government wants drivers to recognise that any action that distracts from the driving task is a risk to their safety (as well as everyone else’s). Drivers should choose not to engage in potentially dangerous activities while driving. Too many Queensland drivers are being distracted while on the road by things like mobile phones, iPods and other hand-held devices.

 

Just a reminder to all staff Personal Mobile phones are strictly forbidden unless it is a requirement of your job. If it is a requirement of your job we have provided work phones.

 

 

 

 

Safe Driving, Saves Lives 27/03/2018

 

Cotton Harvest

 

With Cotton Harvest kicking off at Moonrocks tomorrow and other Farms in the area already started or starting there will be an increased amount of heavy duty large agricultural machinery transporting cotton from one field to the next by way of using public roads including using the back roads. Please drive safely and carefully.  

 

There will be a increase in traffic on Moonrocks Farm especially tractors trucks and Cotton Pickers there will also be A increase in Semi Trucks and Road trains on the roads in transporting the Cotton to the Cotton Gins not just from Moonrocks but other farms in the area.

 

 We STRONGLY encourage all staff NOT to use the back road but to use the main road as this road is marked with lines.

 

 

Please follow the link below as per the directions on our website

 

http://www.moonrocks.com.au/employment-directions 

 

 

Please noteIn Australia you must drive on the left-hand side of the road irrespective of whether there are lines marked or not.

 

Other drivers (CAR / TRUCKS / TRACTORS/ BIKES) DO NOT EXPECT to find your car in the middle of the road.

 

Do not drive in the middle of the road. This notice is for YOUR safety!

 

 

 

Some Common causes of accidents but not ALL causes

Difference in Speed

Most farm machinery is transported at speeds of 20 km/ph or slower while other vehicles often are traveling at much faster speeds. This difference causes motorists to miscalculate how fast they are approaching farm machinery. Motorists sometimes do not even see farm equipment because they are traveling too fast.

 

Motorists unfamiliar with slow moving agricultural machinery can make this a dangerous situation.

 

The potential for an accident is high.

 

 

Signs

Motorists may not slow down when approaching a slow-moving farm machine. Because of this accidents frequently occur between farm equipment and motorists traveling in the same direction.

 

Poor Visibility

Corners, hills, and other blind spots reduce a motorist’s ability to see farm equipment either traveling on the roadway or pulling onto a roadway. Dirty windshields on equipment also reduces operator visibility.

 

Improper Transport Techniques

Failure to securely tie down equipment on truck beds or transport trailers can cause equipment to slide off when going around a curve or when turning, especially when traveling at high speeds.

 

 

Towing Equipment Too Fast

The equipment may start to sway, causing the operator to lose control. Towing implements only with a chain can be extremely hazardous, especially if there is no means to provide tension other than applying brakes.

 

 

 

Size of the Machinery

Today’s large equipment sometimes overlaps into other lanes, creating a hazardous situation.

 

 

 

 

Some Prevention Tips of Road Collisions 

 

 

 

  • See and be seen - Clean off windshields and lights. Turn lights on at dusk or in times of poor visibility such as fog, rain, blowing dust, or cloudy conditions.

 

  •  Before entering the roadway, stop and look both directions.

 

  •  Make sure you have enough time to cross the road or enter the road if traffic is coming or is close

 

  •  Be aware of the road conditions. Know where the hazards exist before you start, such hazards include potholes, ditches, washouts, narrow bridges, blind corners, and sharp curves. Look out for road signs. Trying to avoid these may cause you to drive in the other lane. Be aware of traffic in both directions.  

 

  •  Maintain speeds that are appropriate for the road conditions,

 

 

 

 

 

Remember just because it is your day off or the Packing shed is not working it does not mean the whole farm is on a day off or finished working. Cotton works 24 hours

 

There is a strict speed limit of 30km for all vehicles on farm

 

 

Speed thrills but kills 09/03/2018

Speeding


The faster you go, the longer it takes to stop and, if you crash, the harder the impact. Even small increases in speed could have severe consequences. If a pedestrian steps out into the path of an oncoming vehicle which is speeding the difference could be a matter of life or death.

In an emergency, the average driver takes about 1.5 seconds to react. Stopping distances increase exponentially the faster you go.

When you’re behind the wheel of a car – whether alone or with passengers – driving safely should always be your top concern. We’re more distracted than ever, so it’s crucial to know the basics of safe driving and practice them every time you’re on the road.

 

About speeding

 

Speeding is one of the major causes of fatalities on Queensland roads. Speeding is defined as driving over the posted speed limit or at a speed that is inappropriate given the driving conditions (e.g. rain, fog, traffic volume, traffic flow).

Most people think that speeding is just driving over the speed limit. Speeding is also driving at a speed that is inappropriate for the driving conditions, such as rain, fog, traffic or traffic flow.

During 2015 there were 62 fatalities as a result of crashes involving speeding drivers or riders.

Speed limits are set and enforced to save lives and reduce crashes. Fines and demerit points  apply when a vehicle is caught driving above the posted speed limit.  

It is not safe to speed in any circumstance.

 

Driving within the speed limit maximises your stopping distance giving you more time to react to:

 

  • the actions of other road users around you like vehicles, pedestrians and cyclists

 

  • changes to the road environment itself such as pot holes and obstacles.

 

Speed-related social costs

 

Speed crashes result in high social costs to the community in the forms of:

 

  • hospital and health care costs

 

  • lost productivity in the workplace

 

  • the cost of using emergency services.

 

Speeding has significant costs to the community each year. Speed-related fatalities and hospitalised casualties in Queensland have an estimated cost of $283 million each year†‡.

 

Here at Moonrocks there is A Strict speed limit of 30km/hr which applies to all vehicles and all staff causal or permanent here on farm.

 

Safety rules are your best tools

Working Safely with and Around a Staple / Nail Gun


Although this did not happen at Moonrocks, An apprentice was injured by a nail, fired from a nail gun by another worker, which went through the piece of timber he was holding and into his chest. The worker underwent minor surgery to remove a small piece of bone.

Investigations are continuing.

 

At Moonrocks we use Staple guns and Nail guns and to avoid a similar accident we believe it is important to remind staff about the importance of working safely with a Staple / Nail gun (whether it is connected to the compressed air or not) or if you are using it or not and to work safely around someone who is using one.

 

What is the Problem


Most injuries from Staple / nail guns are caused by the user accidentally striking the gun’s muzzle into a part of the body while holding the tool’s trigger switch. However, there is also a risk of Staples / Nails penetrating a person’s body as a result of:

 

  • direct contact with the muzzle of a loaded gun

 

  • deflection, when skewing off a hard surface

 

  • firing through a soft material.

 

  • in restricted and tight spaces where the gun’s muzzle could be bumped

 

  • when other people could come within the nail gun’s firing path, or there is a foreseeable risk of being struck by a flying nail (e.g. by ricochet or deflection).

 

How to work Safely with a Nail / Staple gun

 

  • Know where your Stop / Start is on the Nail gun / Stapler gun

 

  • Know How to connect the Staple/ Nail gun to the air.

 

  • Know How to disconnect the air

 

  • How to load the Nail gun / Stapler Gun

 

  • Know where your Pinch points are

 

  • Know what is a Safety guards

 

  • Know  How to use the Nail Gun / Stapler gun

 

  • Know How to Hold the nail gun / Stapler gun

 

  • Keep all bodily parts clear of the projectile path of the nail gun / stapler gun

 

  • Be aware of people working around you.

 

  • Correct PPE to be worn at all times.

 

  • Use the Nail gun / Stapler gun only for the purpose for which it was designed.

 

  • Never leave the Nail gun / Stapler in any doorway, entrance, emergency exit or in front of fire extinguishing equipment.

 

  • Before starting each shift, conduct a thorough inspection of the Nail Gun / Stapler Gun

 

  • Operate the Nail gun / Stapler gun strictly in accordance with manufacturer’s specifications.


  • Always disconnect the Air from the Nail gun / Stapler gun when you are leaving it unattended / finished with it

 

If your Nail gun or Stapler gun is not working you must report to you Supervisor and not use it

 

Nail gun / stapler gun must only be repaired by an authorised person should the firing mechanisms not operate correctly, stop using immediately and report to your supervisor

 

If you are injured no matter how minor you must report to your supervisor

 

 

Heat Wave Alert 14/02/2018

 

HEAT WAVE ALERT AGAIN !

 

Who would believe 10 days ago we were wearing long sleeves and we were cold,

Mother nature has decided in honour of Valentines day to put the heat in the air the whole week with temperatures set to hit 43 and stay in the 40's for at least the next 5 days.

 

Thursday 43  degrees

Friday   43 degrees

Saturday 40 degrees

Sunday   40 degrees

Monday  40 degrees

 

How to survive the heat wave

 

  • Stay hydrated by drinking plenty of fluids even if you do not feel thirsty. Avoid drinks with caffeine or alcohol.

  • Eat small meals and eat more often

  • Avoid extreme temperature changes.

  • Wear loose-fitting, lightweight, light-coloured clothing. Avoid dark colours because they absorb the sun’s rays

  • Sun Hats Broad brimmed hat, SPF 30+ sunscreen (as per manufactures instructions) when working outside. To help provide protection against the Sun

 

Heatstroke

 

is a medical emergency and requires urgent attention.

Heatstroke occurs when the core body temperature rises above 40.5 °C and the body’s internal systems start to shut down.

Many organs in the body can suffer damage and to rectify it, the person’s body temperature must be reduced quickly.

Most people will have profound central nervous system changes such as delirium, coma and seizures. The person may stagger, appear confused, have a fit or collapse and become unconscious.

As well as effects on the nervous system, there can be liver, kidney, muscle and heart damage.

The symptoms of heatstroke may be the same as for heat exhaustion, but the skin may be dry with no sweating and the person’s mental condition worsens.

 

 If you do not feel well please report to your supervisor or first aider immediately.

 

 

Those precious fingers don’t ignore, Or they could end up on the floor 21/01/2018

Sharp tool Safety Tips

 

Knives and Snip usage is common in our work place.

 

It is easy to make the mistake of thinking that they are completely safe to use. Potential hand injuries in the workplace can be all too common.

 

it is very important to follow safe knife and Snip handling procedures at all times when using a knife / Sharp tool.

 

Sharp Tool safety tips to consider:

 

  • Always use the correct sharp tool for the job

 

  • Sharp Tools work best when they're sharp. They are easier to operate and safer to use when sharp. Blunt tool can cause injury due to excessive pressure applied

 

  • Point the blade away from yourself when cutting. Make sure no body parts are in the cutting path.

 

  • Be certain that other people are at a safe distance before cutting.

 

  • When not in use, see that you store your knife or snips in a safe location. make sure the blade is safely stored away.

 

  • Never discard loose blades in the garbage or leave them where they can injure an unsuspecting person.

 

  • Use knives and snips for their intended purpose. Using your knife and snips in a way in which they were not designed or on the wrong materials can damage the blade and cause injury to yourself or others.

 

  • If a knife or snip is falling, even a safety knife, you risk injury by trying to stop it with your hand or foot. Let the knife fall to the ground rather than trying to grab it as it falls.

 

  • Do not toss a knife or snips to someone. It is also recommended that you do not hand a knife or snips directly to someone. Set down the knife or snips and let the other person pick it up

 

  • Be alert and pay attention when you are using a knife or snips.  Don’t get distracted or take your eyes off what you are doing

 

  • When carrying a knife or snips always hold the point of the knife and snip downwards

 

Remember when you are working on the Onion Peeler it is compulsory to wear the cut resistant glove which has been provided to you as part of your PPE under your disposable gloves  - NO GLOVE NO WORK

 

If you are unlucky and Cut yourself or someone else:

Please report to your first aider Brett Grayson / Lynda Myburgh immediately all accidents no matter how minor must be reported.

HEAT WAVE ALERT 09/01/2018

Heat wave alert. 

 

Mother nature is not letting up on us and there will be another heat wave in St George QLD with temperatures reaching 44 degrees.

 

Wednesday 41 degrees

Thursday 39  degrees

Friday   40 degrees

Saturday 44 degrees

Sunday   35 degrees

Monday  35 degrees

 

How to survive the heat wave

 

  • Stay hydrated by drinking plenty of fluids even if you do not feel thirsty. Avoid drinks with caffeine or alcohol.

  • Eat small meals and eat more often

  • Avoid extreme temperature changes.

  • Wear loose-fitting, lightweight, light-coloured clothing. Avoid dark colours because they absorb the sun’s rays

  • Sun Hats Broad brimmed hat, SPF 30+ sunscreen (as per manufactures instructions) when working outside. To help provide protection against the Sun

 

How the body controls heat gain and heat loss

 

The human body gains and loses heat in two ways:

  • body heat – the internal heat generated by metabolic processes

  • exchange with the environment – the body exchanges heat with its surroundings mainly through:

  • radiation - the process by which the body gains heat from surrounding hot objects (e.g. hot metal, furnaces or steam pipes), and loses heat to cold objects (e.g. chilled metallic surfaces) without contact with them

  • convection – the process by which the body exchanges heat with the surrounding air. The body gains heat from hot air and loses heat to cold air which comes in contact with the skin

  • evaporation of sweat – the cooling effect is more noticeable with high wind speeds and low relative humidity. In hot and humid workplaces, the body cooling due to sweat evaporation is limited because the air cannot absorb more moisture. In hot and dry workplaces, the cooling due to sweat evaporation is limited by the amount of sweat produced by the body.

  • The body also exchanges small amounts of heat by conduction and breathing, which can usually be discounted when assessing the heat load on the body


Not everyone reacts to heat in the same way

 

The way heat affects people varies from person to person and is influenced by:

  • general health

  • body weight (being overweight or obese can make it more difficult to cope with heat

  • age (particularly for people about 45 years and older)

  • poor general health

  • a low level of fitness will make people more susceptible to feeling the extremes of heat

  • certain prescription and illicit drug us

  • medical conditions (can also increase how susceptible a person is). People with conditions such as heart disease, high blood pressure, pregnancy, respiratory disease and diabetes may need to take special precautions. In addition, people with some types of skin diseases and rashes may be more susceptible to heat.

  • Other factors include circulatory system capacity, sweat production and the ability to regulate electrolyte balance

 

Health effects

 

People have an average core body temperature of around 37˚C. In hot environments, or where internal temperature is raised through exercise for example, body responses include:

 

Normal responses

 

  • vasodilation (widening of blood vessels)

  • sweating

  • increased respiratory rate

  • increased heart rate.

Responses due to heat-strain

 

  • electrolyte changes

  • dehydration

  • elevated core temperature.
  •  

Excessive heat-strain can occur when the work environment, task or individual health prevent these cooling mechanisms from working properly, and can lead to heat-related illnesses including:

 

  • Heat rash – sometimes called ‘prickly heat’. It is a skin irritation caused by excessive sweating and

  • can occur at any age

  • is most commonly associated with humid /dusty tasks in which the skin pores become blocked

  • looks like a red cluster of pimples or small blisters

  • is most likely to occur on the neck and upper chest, and in skin folds and creases

  • Heat cramps – these include muscle pains or spasms, usually in the abdomen, arms or legs. They may occur after strenuous activity in a hot environment, when the body gets depleted of salt and water. They may also be a symptom of heat exhaustion.

  • Dizziness and fainting – heat related dizziness and fainting results from reduced blood flow to the brain. Heat causes an increase in blood flow to the skin and pooling of blood in the legs, which can lead to a sudden drop in blood pressure.

  • Heat exhaustion – is a serious condition that can develop into heatstroke. It occurs when excessive sweating in a hot environment reduces the blood volume. Warning signs may include paleness and sweating, rapid heart rate, muscle cramps (usually in the abdomen, arms or legs), headache, nausea and vomiting, dizziness or fainting.

 

Heatstroke

 

is a medical emergency and requires urgent attention.

Heatstroke occurs when the core body temperature rises above 40.5 °C and the body’s internal systems start to shut down.

Many organs in the body can suffer damage and to rectify it, the person’s body temperature must be reduced quickly.

Most people will have profound central nervous system changes such as delirium, coma and seizures. The person may stagger, appear confused, have a fit or collapse and become unconscious.

As well as effects on the nervous system, there can be liver, kidney, muscle and heart damage.

The symptoms of heatstroke may be the same as for heat exhaustion, but the skin may be dry with no sweating and the person’s mental condition worsens.

 

 If you do not feel well please report to your supervisor or first aider immediately.

Stop! Think! Then Act! Snake Safety 05/01/2018

Snake safety

 

Stick to well-used, open trails. In scrubby areas, use a walking stick to alert a snake of your approach

Avoid walking through thickly vegetated area

Step onto, rather than over fallen logs as there may be a snake on the other side. Do not step or put your hands where you cannot see

 

Avoid putting your hands into places where snakes may shelter

 

  • holes in logs and trees

 

  •  holes made by other animals

 

  •  cracks in the ground

 

  • holes in tree roots

 

  •  under rocks.

 

 

If you see a snake.

 

 

  • If you come across a snake Never attempt to catch or kill a snake. They will defend themselves if confronted or threatened. Most snake bites occur when people try to catch or kill a snake.

 

 

 

  • Remain calm to avoid disturbing it (otherwise it may try to find a place to hide in your house to avoid a confrontation)

 

 

If you are unlucky enough to be bitten

 

 

Snake bite can be life-threatening if the snake is venomous. Symptoms may include pain, swelling, redness or bleeding at the site of the bite. If a person is bitten by a snake, it's important that he or she remains calm, immobilises the bite area and removes jewellery or tight clothing. Emergency medical care should be obtained as soon as possible.

 

 

 

  • Call for help immediately

 

  • Do NOT Try to Suck out the poison

 

  • Do NOT cut the wound

 

  • Do NOT wash the bite. (the hospital has the best chance of identifying the snake by any venom sill around the wound)

 

  • Apply a pressure bandage tightly across the bite and up the limb to immobilise it.

 

  • apply direct and firm pressure to the bite site with your hands (it is also important the patient is kept still).

 

  • Stay as calm and as still as possible while you are waiting to help to come.

 

 

 

Facts

 

 

 

 

 

  • In those attacks in which the snake was positively identified, the brown snake was the most common biter (41%), followed by the tiger snake (17%) and red-bellied black snake (16%). 

 

See you Next year 28/12/2017

 Happy New Year

 

 We would like to wish everyone a Happy New Year and all the best for 2018. With everyone gearing up to celebrate, Although we cannot list all the possible dangers out there we would like to point out a few about mixing alcohol heat and driving 

 

Alcohol, Water, and Hot Weather

 

Periods of extremely hot weather (like the heat waves currently blanketing the country) can cause serious health problems for everyone.

When we attend a hot outdoor event, being unaccustomed to the sun, heat, and increased humidity, some people have problems dealing with the extreme variation of circumstances.

Normally, the body cools itself by sweating. If temperatures and humidity are extremely high, however, sweating is not effective in maintaining the body’s normal temperature. When this happens, blood chemistry can change and internal organs–including the brain and kidneys–can be damaged. Heat also can be stressful if the temperature changes suddenly, since it usually takes several days for the body to adjust to heat.

One of the most overlooked risks of summertime is drinking alcohol.

If you think boozing it up good idea – you should think again.

Drinking alcohol in the hot summer weather can leave you dehydrated, confused and more susceptible to accidents and injuries.

Heat and acts as a diuretic, meaning it causes the body to lose more fluid through urine, resulting in dehydration. If fluids in the body are not replaced, such as by drinking water, you could suffer a heat-related illness, like heat stroke.

In fact, one main danger of drinking during the hot summer weather is the risk of heat stroke caused by dehydration. When the body’s temperature rises, we sweat and the sweat evaporates to cool the body.

However, in hot, humid weather, the sweat does not evaporate properly and body heat rises. The body then tries to sweat even more in order to cool itself down

the first includes heat cramps due to loss of sodium while sweating. Second is heat exhaustion caused by dehydration. Heatstroke, the third and most serious stage, can lead to shock, organ failure, and death.

Alcohol consumption can also affect the central nervous system causing a person to lose inhibitions resulting in poor judgement and recklessness.

 

What is a Heatwave

 

A heatwave is any long period of very hot weather, usually ranging from 37°C to 42°C.

During heatwaves, there is an increase in emergency calls from people suffering heat-related illnesses. While the very young and the elderly are most at risk, anyone can be affected.

Heat-related illness occurs when the body absorbs too much heat. This may happen slowly over a day or two of very hot weather. Act quickly to avoid serious—or even fatal—effects of fully developed heat stroke.

 

The risks of drinking alcohol

 

 Many people consider alcohol to be part of the Australian culture and way of life. But drinking doesn’t always equate to a good time.

There are harms associated with drinking too much both on a single occasion These can be serious and even life threatening.

 

Consequences of drinking too much on a single occasion

 

Statistics show that the serious consequences caused by drinking too much on a single occasion generally fall into three categories:

 

  • Health/safety– Injury is the most likely effect (for example falls, vehicle accidents and assaults), but you can also overdose on alcohol.

 

  • Legal – Alcohol contributes to criminal behaviour such as assaults, property damage, disorderly or offensive behaviour, and drink driving.

 

  • Social – Problems can range from losing friends because of the way you act when you’re drunk to not being able to pay bills because of excessive spending 

 

 

Blood Alcohol Concentration (BAC)

 

Although it varies between individuals, there is a relationship between the concentration of alcohol in the blood (Blood Alcohol Concentration) and its effects.

The body will only process around one standard drink per hour. This means, for every standard drink you have, it will take one hour for your BAC to return back to 0.00g%.

Alcohol starts to affect the brain within five minutes of being consumed. The blood alcohol concentration (BAC) peaks about 30 to 45 minutes after one standard drink is consumed. Rapid consumption of multiple drinks results in a higher BAC because on average, a person can only break down one standard drink per hour.

 

The effects of alcohol vary depending on a number of factors including:

 

  • type and quantity of alcohol consumed

 

  • age, weight and gender

 

  • body chemistry

 

  • food in the stomach

 

  • drinking experience

 

  • situation in which drinking occurs

 

  • mental health status

 

  • other health conditions made worse by alcohol

 

Safe drink driving? There’s no such thing.

 

Australia has strict laws about drinking alcohol and driving, with the legal limit set at 0.05 blood alcohol concentration (BAC). Learners and probationary licence-holders must have a 0.00 BAC.

Even after just a few drinks, your driving ability is affected. The more you drink, the higher your blood alcohol concentration, and the greater your chance of having an accident.

If you know you are going to be drinking, make alternative plans for getting home.  Arrange a lift with a friend who isn’t drinking,

A little over the limit? Twice as likely to crash.

 

How alcohol affects your driving

 

If you drink alcohol and drive, you’re likely to find it difficult to:

 

  • concentrate properly

 

  • judge the distance between your car and other vehicles

 

  • judge the speed of your vehicle

 

  • keep your balance if you are riding a motorbike

 

  • notice traffic lights, pedestrians and other hazards

 

  • see and hear normally

 

  • stay awake

 

  • react appropriately to things going on around you, particularly if an unexpected hazard should suddenly appear.

 

 

BAC LEVEL   EFFECTS FROM ALCOHOL FROM DRIVING   0.02 TO 0.05

 

  • Reduced ability to see or locate moving lights correctly

 

  • Reduced ability to judge distances

 

  • Increased tendency to take risk

 

  • Decreased ability to respond

 

 

BAC LEVEL   EFFECTS FROM ALCOHOL FROM DRIVING   0.05

 

  • Twice as likely to have a crash tan before drinking

 

BAC LEVEL   EFFECTS FROM ALCOHOL FROM DRIVING   0.05 to 0.08

 

  • Further reduction in ability to judge distances

 

  • Impaired sensitivity to red lights

 

  • Slower reactions

 

  • Shorter concentration span

 

 

BAC LEVEL   EFFECTS FROM ALCOHOL FROM DRIVING   0.08

 

  • Five times more likely to have a crash than before drinking

 

BAC LEVEL   EFFECTS FROM ALCOHOL FROM DRIVING   0.08 to 0.12

 

  • Overestimate abilities

 

  • “Euphoria” sets in

 

  • Reckless driving

 

  • Impaired peripheral vision (resulting in accidents due to hitting vehicles while passing)

 

  • Impaired perception of obstacles

 

  • Ten times more likely to have a crash than before drinking

Keep Safe on the Road This Christmas 19/12/2017

 Road Safety & Christmas holidays

 

This time of year, is one of the most high-risk times on Australia Roads with many people hitting the road to attend Christmas parties, end of year celebrations, and heading towards the coast for a well-deserved break. Driver’s must remember that travelling during holiday periods can be riskier because of increased traffic volumes, congestion, tiredness, people driving in unfamiliar environments, and a higher number of people who are driving under the influence of alcohol.

 

If you decide to go away a few key points

 

  • The first step is to make sure your vehicle is operating properly. The lights, oil, tires (condition and pressure level), belts and hoses, brake fluid, coolant and the condition of the battery should all be checked by a professional before leaving.

  • Plan your route in advance and check traffic reports and weather conditions before you leave. As a backup, bring along a paper map. Even with a GPS system it's wise to bring along another option should something occur where using a GPS is not possible.

  • Follow speed limits and remember excess traffic and congestion on the roads may mean you'll have to travel below posted limits. Drive defensively and don't respond to aggressive drivers: It's far less frustrating to let an aggressive driver pass than to become aggressive yourself

  • Remember roads will be very busy with a lot more inexperienced driver on the roads.

  • It sounds simple, but a good night's sleep before departing can help make the trip more enjoyable. Be sure to take regular breaks during long road trips as it can be very dangerous to drive when you're overly tired. Pull over and stop in a safe area if you are tired, or around every 100 miles or 2 hours.

  • Be prepared for emergencies - keep a blanket, boots, an extra pair of gloves and a flashlight in the boot of your car and a big bottle of water.,

  •  Make sure you have enough fuel to get you to your next fuel stop as some stops can be at least 200km in between.
     
  •  Let someone know where you are going and what time you expect to be there

  • Finally, relax. Driving during the holiday season can be stressful. Frustration can lead to poor decisions and risky behaviour behind the wheel. However, with the right attitude and some pre-planning it can also be more enjoyable. Remember to relax and focus on what's truly important: reaching your destination safely\

 

 Remember Double demerit points APPLY during the festive holidays on Australian roads!!!!

 

 

 

 Please note – In Australia you must drive on the left-hand side of the road irrespective of whether there are lines marked or not.

 

 Other drivers (CAR / TRUCKS / TRACTORS/ BIKES) DO NOT EXPECT to find your car in the middle of the road.

 

 Do not drive in the middle of the road. This notice is for YOUR safety!

 

Australian Christmas traditions

Christmas Day is when families and close friends gather together from all over Australia. The highlight of the day is the holiday midday dinner. Some families enjoy a traditional British Christmas dinner of roast turkey or ham and rich plum pudding doused in brandy and set aflame before it is brought to the table. The person who gets the favor baked inside will enjoy good luck all year round.

Other families head for the backyard barbie to grill their Christmas dinner in the sunshine. Many families even go to the beach or to the countryside and enjoy a picnic of cold turkey or ham and a salad.

 

 If there was a Santa Claus delivering gifts on Christmas eve

 

  • No known species of reindeer can fly. BUT there are 300,000 species of living organisms yet to be classified, and while most of these are insects and germs, this does not COMPLETELY rule out flying reindeer which only Santa has ever seen

 

  • There are 2 billion children (persons under 18) in the world. BUT since Santa doesn't (appear to) handle the Muslim, Hindu, Jewish and Buddhist children, that reduces the workload to 15% of the total - 378 million according to Population Reference Bureau. At an average (census)rate of 3.5 children per household, that's 91.8 million homes. One presumes there's at least one good child in each.

 

  • Santa has 31 hours of Christmas to work with, thanks to the different time zones and the rotation of the earth, assuming he travels east to west(which seems logical). This works out to 822.6 visits per second. This is to say that for each Christian household with good children, Santa has 1/1000th of a second to park, hop out of the sleigh, jump down the chimney, fill the stockings, distribute the remaining presents under the tree, eat whatever snacks have been left, get back up the chimney, get back into the sleigh and move on to the next house. Assuming that each of these 91.8 million stops are evenly distributed around the earth (which, of course, we know to be false but for the purposes of our calculations we will accept), we are now talking about .78 miles per household, a total trip of 75-1/2 million miles, not counting stops to do what most of us must do at least once every 31 hours, plus feeding etc.

 

  • This means that Santa's sleigh is moving at 650 miles per second, 3,000 times the speed of sound. For purposes of comparison, the fastest man- made vehicle on earth, the Ulysses space probe, moves at a poky 27.4 miles per second - a conventional reindeer can run, tops, 15 miles per hour

 

  • The payload on the sleigh adds another interesting element. Assuming that each child gets nothing more than a medium-sized lego set (2 pounds), the sleigh is carrying 321,300 tons, not counting Santa, who is invariably described as overweight. On land, conventional reindeer can pull no more than 300 pounds. Even granting that "flying reindeer" (see point #1) could pull TEN TIMES the normal anoint, we cannot do the job with eight, or even nine. We need 214,200 reindeer. This increases the payload - not even counting the weight of the sleigh - to 353,430 tons. Again, for comparison - this is four times the weight of the Queen Elizabeth.

 

  • 353,000 tons traveling at 650 miles per second creates enormous air resistance - this will heat the reindeer up in the same fashion as space crafts re-entering the earth's atmosphere. The lead pair of reindeer will absorb 14.3 QUINTILLION joules of energy. Per second. Each. In short, they will burst into flame almost instantaneously, exposing the reindeer behind them, and create deafening sonic booms in their wake. The entire reindeer team will be vaporized within 4.26 thousandths of a second. Santa, meanwhile, will be subjected to centrifugal forces 17,500.06 times greater than gravity. A 250-pound Santa (which seems ludicrously slim)would be pinned to the back of his sleigh by 4,315,015 pounds of force.

 

In conclusion — If Santa ever DID deliver presents on Christmas Eve, he's dead now

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

.

 

Heat Wave Alert - 13/12/2017

Heat wave alert.  

 

Please note over the next few days, there will be a heat wave in St George QLD with temperatures reaching 40 degrees.

 

Thursday 38 degrees

Friday   40 degrees

Saturday 37 degrees

Sunday   35 degrees

Monday  37 degrees

 

 How to survive the heat wave

 

  • Stay hydrated by drinking plenty of fluids even if you do not feel thirsty. Avoid drinks with caffeine or alcohol.

  • Eat small meals and eat more often

  • Avoid extreme temperature changes.

  • Wear loose-fitting, lightweight, light-coloured clothing. Avoid dark colours because they absorb the sun’s rays

  • Sun Hats Broad brimmed hat, SPF 30+ sunscreen (as per manufactures instructions) when working outside. To help provide protection against the Sun

 

How the body controls heat gain and heat loss

 

The human body gains and loses heat in two ways:

  • body heat – the internal heat generated by metabolic processes

  • exchange with the environment – the body exchanges heat with its surroundings mainly through:

  • radiation - the process by which the body gains heat from surrounding hot objects (e.g. hot metal, furnaces or steam pipes), and loses heat to cold objects (e.g. chilled metallic surfaces) without contact with them

  • convection – the process by which the body exchanges heat with the surrounding air. The body gains heat from hot air and loses heat to cold air which comes in contact with the skin

  • evaporation of sweat – the cooling effect is more noticeable with high wind speeds and low relative humidity. In hot and humid workplaces, the body cooling due to sweat evaporation is limited because the air cannot absorb more moisture. In hot and dry workplaces, the cooling due to sweat evaporation is limited by the amount of sweat produced by the body.

  • The body also exchanges small amounts of heat by conduction and breathing, which can usually be discounted when assessing the heat load on the body


Not everyone reacts to heat in the same way

 

The way heat affects people varies from person to person and is influenced by:

  • general health

  • body weight (being overweight or obese can make it more difficult to cope with heat

  • age (particularly for people about 45 years and older)

  • poor general health

  • a low level of fitness will make people more susceptible to feeling the extremes of heat

  • certain prescription and illicit drug us

  • medical conditions (can also increase how susceptible a person is). People with conditions such as heart disease, high blood pressure, pregnancy, respiratory disease and diabetes may need to take special precautions. In addition, people with some types of skin diseases and rashes may be more susceptible to heat.

  • Other factors include circulatory system capacity, sweat production and the ability to regulate electrolyte balance

 

Health effects

 

People have an average core body temperature of around 37˚C. In hot environments, or where internal temperature is raised through exercise for example, body responses include:

 

Normal responses

 

  • vasodilation (widening of blood vessels)

  • sweating

  • increased respiratory rate

  • increased heart rate.

Responses due to heat-strain

 

  • electrolyte changes

  • dehydration

  • elevated core temperature.
  •  

Excessive heat-strain can occur when the work environment, task or individual health prevent these cooling mechanisms from working properly, and can lead to heat-related illnesses including:

 

  • Heat rash – sometimes called ‘prickly heat’. It is a skin irritation caused by excessive sweating and

  • can occur at any age

  • is most commonly associated with humid /dusty tasks in which the skin pores become blocked

  • looks like a red cluster of pimples or small blisters

  • is most likely to occur on the neck and upper chest, and in skin folds and creases

  • Heat cramps – these include muscle pains or spasms, usually in the abdomen, arms or legs. They may occur after strenuous activity in a hot environment, when the body gets depleted of salt and water. They may also be a symptom of heat exhaustion.

  • Dizziness and fainting – heat related dizziness and fainting results from reduced blood flow to the brain. Heat causes an increase in blood flow to the skin and pooling of blood in the legs, which can lead to a sudden drop in blood pressure.

  • Heat exhaustion – is a serious condition that can develop into heatstroke. It occurs when excessive sweating in a hot environment reduces the blood volume. Warning signs may include paleness and sweating, rapid heart rate, muscle cramps (usually in the abdomen, arms or legs), headache, nausea and vomiting, dizziness or fainting.

 

Heatstroke

 

is a medical emergency and requires urgent attention.

Heatstroke occurs when the core body temperature rises above 40.5 °C and the body’s internal systems start to shut down.

Many organs in the body can suffer damage and to rectify it, the person’s body temperature must be reduced quickly.

Most people will have profound central nervous system changes such as delirium, coma and seizures. The person may stagger, appear confused, have a fit or collapse and become unconscious.

As well as effects on the nervous system, there can be liver, kidney, muscle and heart damage.

The symptoms of heatstroke may be the same as for heat exhaustion, but the skin may be dry with no sweating and the person’s mental condition worsens.

 

 If you do not feel well please report to your supervisor or first aider immediately.

 

When Thunder Roars Go Indoors 05-12-2017

Storm safety

 

Severe weather is a natural part of living in Queensland. St George has been known to experiences severe weather and it's important to take the time to prepare yourself.

The following tips offer advice on what you should have in your emergency kit and how to stay safe before, during and after a severe weather event.

 

Prepare a Storm emergency kit

 

Prepare an emergency kit with these suggested items:

 

  • a portable battery operated radio and torch with fresh or spare batteries and bulb 

  • a list of  radio station for emergency information

  • candles with waterproof matches or a gas lantern

  • reasonable stocks of fresh water and tinned or dried food

  • a first aid kit and basic first aid knowledge

  • good supplies of essential medication

  • strong shoes and rubber gloves

  • a waterproof bag for clothing and valuables – put valuables and certificates in the bag and put the bag in a safe place

  • a list of your emergency contact numbers

  • a car charger for your mobile phone

 

As the storm approaches

 

When a severe storm approaches, make sure you have your mobile phone close by, and it has a fully charged battery. Listen to a local radio station for information and disconnect all electrical appliances.

 

When the storm strikes

 

When a severe storm strikes, stay inside, keep away from windows and remain in the strongest part of the house which is usually the bathroom or cellar. If you are outdoors, find emergency shelter and do not stand under trees.

 

You should 

 

  • listen to your portable radio for storm update

  • if driving, stop clear of trees, powerlines and creeks

  • avoid using the telephone during the storm

  • Unplug any electronic equipment well before the storm arrives.
  • Get inside a home, building

 

After the storm passes

 

after the storm has passed, listen to your local radio for official warnings and advice. If you need emergency assistance, phone 

 

  • 000 (triple zero) - for life threatening emergencies

  • the State Emergency Service (SES) on 132 500

  • check your cabin for damage

  • stay away from fallen powerlines.

  • beware of damaged buildings, trees and flooded watercourses

  • be available to help neighbors if required

 

Understanding flood warnings

 

BOM issues a number of different types of warnings before and during weather events which could result in flooding. Triggers to listen and watch out for include:

  • flood warnings, severe weather and thunderstorm warnings, especially those mentioning the possibility of flash flooding

  • prolonged heavy rain

  • rising creeks and rivers, and localized pooling of water.

 

Where to access warning

 

Warnings are sent from BOM to media, Council, Department of Emergency Services and other agencies involved in managing severe weather and flood response activities. The list below identifies ways for you to access warning information.

 

  • internet - Bureau of Meteorology website

  • radio - tune into your local radio station

  • television - watch out for televised weather updates

  • BOMs weather service - online or by phone 1300 659 219 (local call charges apply)

 

 Interpreting flood warnings

 

  • Minor flooding - Causes inconvenience. Low-lying areas next to watercourses are inundated which may require the removal of stock and equipment. Minor roads may be closed and low-level bridges submerged.

  • Moderate flooding - In addition to the above, the evacuation of some houses may be required. Main traffic routes may be cut by flood waters.

  • Major flooding - In addition to the above, extensive areas are inundated. Properties and suburbs are likely to be isolated and major traffic routes likely to be closed. Evacuation of people from flood-affected areas may be required.

 

Risks during floods

 

Flood waters can be dangerous. Be aware of the following:

  • Drowning - do no play in or near stormwater drains. During a flood, water moves quickly through drains that may be dry for most of the year.

  • Currents - Don't walk or swim in flood waters. As little as 15 centimetres of moving water can knock you off your feet.

  • Electrocution - Stay clear of fallen power lines and electrical wires. Electricity passes easily through water.

  • Contamination - Wash your hands and feet with soap if you do come into contact with flood water. Sewage or chemicals can be found in flood water.

  • Slipping - Tread carefully. Slippery surfaces can cause falls and injuries.

  • Wildlife - Be aware that there may be displaced and stressed wildlife inside your home and yard. Wildlife lose their homes in flood too.

Driving and road safety

 

Roads often become flooded before water affects homes. It is important that you stay informed of local road conditions to prevent you and your family from becoming isolated.

Many drivers rescued from flood waters report that they were in a hurry to get home to safety as a reason for tempting the danger of driving into water. Regardless of the type of car and despite what car commercials show, driving into flood waters is dangerous considering:

 

  • most flood-related deaths occur at night and involve cars driving on flooded roads

  • creeks and rivers can rise very quickly and the road surface can also wash away making the water much deeper than it appears

  • once cars are swept downstream they will often roll to one side or perhaps flip over entirely. The driver and occupants have little time to escape the vehicle

 

Evacuation

 

It is natural to want to stay and protect your home and valuables.

However, as flood waters rise, dangers increase and evacuation may be required.

Council works with may government and community groups to manage flood events as smoothly as possible. If you are asked to evacuate, do so immediately. You may consider finding safer temporary accommodation such as a friend or relative's house. If you are evacuating voluntarily, remember to tell a relative or neighbour or Friend where you are going.

Emergency shelters can change depending on where the water is.

Before you evacuate, remind your family or other household members of your central contact point in case you get separated. Make sure each household member has important phone numbers with them

 

Lightning Facts

 

Lightning is a powerful burst of electricity that happens very quickly during a thunderstorm.

 

  • Lightning is caused by an electrical charge in the atmosphere that is unbalanced.

  • The movement of rain and ice inside a thundercloud creates an electrical charge, with the negative charge (electrons) forming at the bottom of the cloud and the positive charge (protons) forming at the top.

  • Opposites attract so the negative charge at the bottom of the cloud seeks out a positive charge to connect with.

  • Lightning can occur inside clouds, between clouds and from clouds to the ground.

  • Around one quarter of lightning is from cloud to ground.

  • When lightning strikes the ground it seeks out the shortest route to something with a positive charge, this might be a tree, a tall building or if they’re very unlucky, a person.

  • Thousands of people are struck by lightning every year.

  • Direct lightning strikes are usually fatal.

  • Lightning rods (also called conductors) are metal rods or similar objects that divert lightning safely to the ground, they can often be seen at the top of tall buildings.

  • Most lightning occurs over land rather than oceans, with around 70% of it occurring in the Tropics.

  • There are bolts of lightning striking somewhere on Earth every second.

  • Lightning strikes usually last around 1 or 2 microseconds.

  • Lightning contains millions of volts of electricity.

  • Thunder is the sound caused by lightning.

  • The average temperature of lightning is around 20000 °C (36000 °F).

  • Lightning is usually produced by cumulonimbus clouds that are very tall and dense

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

      

 

Be sure be safe 17-11-2017

 

What is First aid?

First aid is the assistance given to any person suffering a sudden illness or injury with care provided to preserve life, prevent the condition from worsening, or to promote recovery. It includes initial intervention in a serious condition prior to professional medical help being available, such as performing CPR while awaiting an ambulance as well as the complete treatment of minor conditions, such as applying a plaster to a cut. First aid is generally performed by the Layperson with many people trained in providing basic levels of first aid, and others willing to do so from acquired knowledge.

As we are located 25km from the nearest town, it is important our employees know, where to find the first aid location and who is first aid trained. What to do in the event of an emergency or evacuation

 

The contents of our First Aid Kits

Our First aid kits contain many different items we believe have the best possible way of assisting our employees with many different injuries although not all (Remember we are not doctors) from snake bandages, heat blankets, triangle bandages, eye wash, burn creams, tweezers, scissors and band aids to name but just a few. It is important we don’t just raid the first aid kit for the sake of it, but to ensure we only use them for an injury we have. Remember we are located 25km from town, if you have taken all the bandages and you don’t tell anyone and something happens??? What do we use in the event of an emergency?

 

 

Location of our first aid kits

Our first aid kits are located in the smoko room of the packing shed, the smoko room in the top shed.  in the office, Justin’s ute, the work shop at Blenheim farm

 

 

WHAT TO DO IN A EMERGENCY…

If someone has collapsed, or is not breathing or seriously injured, ring 000 for an ambulance, following the instructions of the emergency service.

 

Important contact numbers

Police/ Ambulance/ Fire department 000

 

ST George QLD hospital 07 4620 2222

 

Local doctors 07 4625 5344

 

Poisons helpline 13 11 26

 

First aiders.

Brett Grayson.

Lynda Myburgh

 

Different kind injuries but not all

 

*       Bites and Scratches

 

*       Broken Bones, Sprains, and Strains

 

*       Bug Bites and Stings

 

*       Burns

 

*       CPR

 

*       Choking

 

*       Concussions

 

*       Dealing With Cuts

 

*       Dehydration

 

*       Eye Injuries

 

*       Fevers

 

*       Frequently Asked Questions About Casts

 

*       Head Injuries

 

*       Heat Illness

 

*       Nosebleeds

 

*       Seizures

 

*       Serious Allergic Reactions (Anaphylaxis)

 

*       Snake bites

 

*       Vomiting

 

Know your injury.

It is important you read what to do in the likes of different kind of situations from Snake bites to burns to just a paper cut,

 

Remember…

If you are unlucky and require first aid, remain calm and No matter how minor an injury all injuries must be reported to a supervisor

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Don’t Be A Drip! Take A Sip! 09/11/2017

Heatstroke

 

Heatstroke is a life-threatening condition in which the body overheat when it can no longer maintain a healthy temperature. The high body temperature in heatstroke can lead to organ damage. You can avoid heatstroke by taking precautions in very hot weather.

 

What is heatstroke?

 

Heatstroke occurs when a person’s body temperature rises from about 37°C to above 40.5°C. It is sometimes called hyperthermia.

 

Heatstroke needs immediate first aid to lower the body temperature as quickly as possible.

 

Dehydration and heat exhaustion are milder types of heat-related illnesses.

 

What causes heatstroke?

 

Heatstroke is caused by prolonged exposure to heat. You can get heatstroke inside or outside.

You can get it exercising in the heat.

 

Heatstroke symptoms

 

The signs and symptoms of heatstroke include:

 

  • rapid pulse and fast, shallow breathing

 

  • trouble speaking, concentrating or coordinating movements

 

 

  • sudden rise in body temperature

 

  • hot and dry and possibly red skin, possibly with no sweat

 

  • dry, swollen tongue

 

 

 

 

Heatstroke treatment

 

Heatstroke is a medical emergency. If someone has heatstroke call triple zero (000) and ask for an ambulance.

 

Meanwhile, give the person sips of cool fluid if possible and lay them in a cool shady place.

 

Lower their body temperature any way you can, for example by:

 

  • removing excess clothing

 

  • sponging or spraying them with water and fanning the damp skin

 

  • immersing them in cool water

 

  • placing cold packs under their armpits or groin, or on the back of their neck.

 

 

Taking Measures to prevent Heat stroke….

 

Hydration                                                                                                                                                                                                                            

 

During prolonged work in the heat our body can sweat up to one litre an hour. Unless this fluid is replaced by drinking, progressive dehydration will result.

 

Thirst may not trigger drinking until fluid that is equal to one to two per cent of body weight has been lost – at which level; workers are at increased risk of developing heat-related illness. Food must be consumed at meal breaks in order to replace electrolytes and maintain energy.

 

Ways to maintain adequate hydration:

 

  • Start work in a well-hydrated state and maintain this with regular drinking to keep pace with sweat losses. To improve hydration a conscious effort needs to made to drink fluids at a faster rate than they are being lost through sweating and other means.

 

  • Workers exposed to heat stress need to drink between 600 milliliters and one litre of water per hour in summer.

 

  • Manual workers: approximately one litre per hour of plain cool water (supplemented by frequent meal breaks) and machinery operators 600 milliliters per hour of water.

 

  • Drink 150-250 milliliters of cool fluids every 15 minutes, rather than consume a one litre drink every now and again.

 

  • Avoid caffeinated drinks.

 

  • Increase your intake of fluids if your urine is dark (the normal colour should be pale yellow).

 

  • If you suffer any dehydration symptoms report to a first aider immediately.

 

  • Drink cool water at frequent intervals to prevent dehydration

 

  • Wear loose fitting clothing to promote good air circulation. (inside preferably short sleeved shirt/short) If working outside preferably (light long sleeved shirt / trousers)

 

Sun Protection                                                                                                                                                                                                                    

Controlling exposure to UV radiation through the implementation of our comprehensive sun safety policy.

 

Ways of controlling exposure include:

 

  • Dark coloured fabrics such as greens, blues and reds that inhibit UV light penetration

 

  • Close weave fabrics provide the best form of sun protection, as they block out most of the UVR

 

  • Long sleeves, a collar and long loose trousers will increase the sun protection of clothing when working outside.

 

  • A hat with a broad brim (10-12 cm) or a flap at the back to shade both the face and back of the neck and a close weave

 

  • Avoid a hat lined with white fabric as it will reflect UVR.

 

  • Sun protection factor (SPF) of 30+, broad-spectrum (protects against UVA and UVB), water-resistant, check the use by date.

 

 Personal Protection Equipment                                                                                                                                                                                           

 

Other PPE that you might be required to use or wear

 

  • Sun Hats Broad brimmed hat, SPF 30+ sunscreen (as per manufactures instructions) when working outside. To help provide protection against the Sun

 

  • Outside preferably (light long sleeved shirt / trousers) To Help provide protection against the Sun.

 

Are you wearing the right Protection? 02/11/2017

 

The Importance PPE (PERSONAL PROTECTOR EQUIPMENT)

 

Accidents are a part and parcel of life. They can occur everywhere and at any time. The chances of an accident happening are considerably higher in a workplace than at home.

 

However, accidents can be avoided if necessary precautions are undertaken by the workers. For instance, wearing personal protective equipment when doing work can help the workers in ensuring their safety and reducing the risk of accidents.  Personal protective equipment (PPE) is clothing or equipment designed to be worn by someone to protect them from the risk of injury or illness. PPE

 

 HIVIS

 

Hi Vis workwear is a type of personal protective equipment that helps in increasing the visibility of worker. Hi-vis clothing makes workers more visible, which can significantly reduce the chance of a life-threatening accident from happening

 

The use of this workwear is done to keep the workers safe from being hit by trucks and forklifts that are moving about in the workplace.

 

Because of the kind of work, we do here at Moonrocks with moving equipment and having a lot of traffic on the ground and on forklifts / tractors and trucks

 

Moonrocks has designed a Moonrocks HIVIS CAP and Bucket hat as our chosen HIVIS and is a part of our uniform. Where all members of staff are required to wear it.

 

Other types of PPE

  • hearing protective devices, such as ear muffs and ear plug

 

  •  respiratory protective equipment

 

  • eye and face protection, such as safety glasses and face shields

 

  • safety helmets

 

 

  • skin protection, such as gloves, gauntlets and sunscreen

 

  • clothing, such as high visibility vests, life jackets and coverall

 

  • footwear, such as safety boots and rubber boots.

 

Maintenance

 

 

Proper care and maintenance is essential to ensure PPE continues to provide the necessary level of protection.

 

  • Look for broken or damaged components before using PPE and repair or replace it as needed.

 

  • Replace PPE that has expired or reached its usable lifespan.

 

  • Clean reusable PPE after use and store in a clean area such as a cupboard, drawer or resealable container.

 

  • Report broken, damaged or contaminated PPE.

 

Where does the use of PPE fit in the risk management process?

 

The use of personal protective equipment is lowest on the list of control priorities. These controls should not be relied on as the primary means,

 

Each worker has the duty to:

 

  • Follow all safe work practices, procedures, instructions and rules

 

  •  Work in a manner which ensures the health and safety of him or herself and other

 

  • Encourage other workers to work in a healthy and safe manner

 

  • Participate in training

 

  • Report or rectify and unsafe conditions that come to their attention

 

  • Keep passageways and exits clear

 

Should you have any concerns or questions with your current PPE please come and see us and we will happily assist you.

 

 

 

 

 

Where's that Forklift? 22/10/2017

 

 

Every year hundreds of people are seriously injured or even killed while working or standing in the vicinity of forklifts.

 

Even while travelling at very slow speeds, forklifts can potentially crush and severely injure pedestrians, tip over or lose its load.

 

Forklift safety is very important and Workers can protect themselves when they are working near forklifts by using their senses and common sense.

  

 Pedestrians 

 

Pedestrians must learn to listen and look for warning signs that indicate a forklift is nearby so they can take steps to avoid the forklift. They should:

 

  • Listen for the sound of forklift horns. Forklift operators should sound the horn when approaching intersections, corners, blind spots, other forklifts, and areas with pedestrians.

 

  • Listen for the sound of backup alarms. Most forklifts have a backup alarm that sounds whenever the forklift is moving in reverse.

 

  • Listen for the sounds of the forklift engine. The engines of combustion forklifts will be louder when the forklift is traveling or when the forklift is raising a load. However, because electric forklifts are usually very quiet, listening for engine noise from them will not help.

 

  • Look for flashing lights,

 

 

Walking Safely near Forklifts

 

In order to maintain an awareness of where forklifts are, workers should:

 

  • Avoid distractions when walking out where there is forklift traffic, including reading paperwork or talking with other pedestrians.

 

  • Stop and look both ways before entering a forklift lane, crossing an aisle, walking up to a blind corner, or walking across an intersection where forklifts travel.

 

  • Walk single file along the side of an aisle that has forklift traffic, or keep to designated walking aisles.

 

  • DO NOT RUN IN FRONT OF FORKLIFTS

  

Approaching a Forklift Driver

 

If a pedestrian needs to approach a forklift driver to discuss something, he or she should:

 

  • Stay back from the forklift until the driver sees him or her.

 

  • Wait for the driver to stop the forklift.

 

  • Approach the forklift after the driver motions him or her over.

 

 

 

When approaching the forklift, workers should be careful to: 

 

 

  • Keep their feet away from the forklift.

 

  • Walk away before the driver moves the forklift, rather than standing next to the forklift and waiting for the driver to pull away.

 

  • Keep your distance Fully loaded, a standard forklift and its load can have a combined weight of five or more tonnes. If you work near forklifts, you are equally at risk from being killed or seriously injured through being hit or crushed by the forklift itself, or being hit or crushed by the load the forklift is moving.

 

 

 You are most at risk of being hit by a forklift or its load if you  are:

 

• walking alongside it

 

• picking stock off a nearby shelf

 

• walking in between it and a delivery vehicle

 

• stepping in to its path,

 

• assisting with loading/unloading

 

• Be aware that a forklift operators field of vision is obscured by the mast and load – don’t assume they have seen you.

 

 

Forklift operators

 

  • Comply with the operating instructions.

 

  • Use the forklift truck only for the purpose for which it was designed.

 

  • Carry out a daily safety inspection of the forklift before you operate the forklift.

 

  • Remain seated while the forklift is moving and do not lean outside of the unit.

 

  • Slow down when travelling close to obstacles, other vehicles, or pedestrians.

 

  • Maintain a clear view ahead and behind (using a correctly adjusted rear view mirror) and give clear indication of your intentions. 

 

  • Maintain a safe distance from other vehicles.

 

  • Use the horn at intersections and blind corners

 

  • Follow speed limits and slow down

 

  • Drive carefully on wet or slippery surfaces.

 

  • Reduce speed when making a turn.

 

  • Drive in reverse if vision is obscured by a bulky load.

 

  • Slow down on sloping or uneven ground.

 

  • Wear high visibility clothing.

 

  • Do not carry passengers.

 

 

Forklift drivers have a duty of care and under the law are lawfully responsible for any accidents caused. 

 

However this does not mean pedestrians have right of way. Pedestrians must follow our forklift safety rules!

 

Should anyone have any concerns in regards to a forklift driver or pedestrian please come and see us, all complaints will be held in a sensitive timely and confidential manner.

 

Remember safety is everyone’s responsibility

 

 

 

Avoid the worst. Put safety first 19/07/2017

 

Knife Safety Tips

 

Knives usage is common in our work place at the moment with Broccoli harvest and Broccoli Packing and of course Onion peeling

 

It is easy to make the mistake of thinking that they are completely safe to use. Potential hand injuries in the workplace can be all too common.

 

it is very important to follow safe knife handling procedures at all times when using a knife / Sharp tool.

 

 

Knife safety tips to consider:

 

  • Always use the correct knife for the job

 

  • knives work best when they're sharp. They are easier to operate and safer to use when sharp. Blunt knives can cause injury due to excessive pressure applied

 

  • Point the blade away from yourself when cutting. Make sure no body parts are in the cutting path.

 

  • Be certain that other people are at a safe distance before cutting.

 

  • When not in use, see that you store your knife or cutter in a safe location. make sure the blade is safely stored away.

 

  • Never discard loose blades in the garbage or leave them where they can injure an unsuspecting person.

 

  • Use knives and cutters for their intended purpose. Using your knife in a way in which they were not designed or on the wrong materials can damage the blade and cause injury to yourself or others.

 

  • If a knife is falling, even a safety knife, you risk injury by trying to stop it with your hand or foot. Let the knife fall to the ground rather than trying to grab it as it falls.

 

  • Do not toss a knife to someone. It is also recommended that you do not hand a knife directly to someone. Set down the knife and let the other person pick it up

 

  • Be alert and pay attention when you are using a knife.  Don’t get distracted or take your eyes off what you are doing

 

  • When carrying a knife always hold the point of the knife downwards

 

If you are unlucky and Cut yourself or someone else:

Please report to your first aider immediately all accidents no matter how minor must be reported.

 

 

 

Accidents hurt, Safety doesn’t - 23/03/2017

 

Cotton Harvest

 

With Cotton Harvest, now truly under way most Cotton Farms Transporting agricultural machinery from one field to the next by way of public roads is a necessity form and very common in this area

 

There is an increase in traffic on Moonrocks Farm especially tractors trucks and Cotton Pickers

There has also been an increase in traffic on the public roads especially the back road

 

We STRONGLY encourage all staff NOT to use the back road but to use the main road as this road is marked with lines.

Please follow the link below as per the directions on our website

 

http://www.moonrocks.com.au/employment-directions

 

 

Some Common causes of accidents but not ALL causes

 

Difference in Speed

 

Most farm machinery is transported at speeds of 30 km/ph or slower while other vehicles often are traveling at much faster speeds. This difference causes motorists to miscalculate how fast they are approaching farm machinery. Motorists sometimes do not even see farm equipment because they are traveling too fast.

 

Motorists unfamiliar with slow moving agricultural machinery can make this a dangerous situation.

 

The potential for an accident is high.

 

Signs

Motorists may not slow down when approaching a slow-moving farm machine. Because of this accidents frequently occur between farm equipment and motorists traveling in the same direction.

Poor Visibility

 

Corners, hills, and other blind spots reduce a motorist’s ability to see farm equipment either traveling on the roadway or pulling onto a roadway. Dirty windshields on equipment also reduces operator visibility.

Improper Transport Techniques

 

Failure to securely tie down equipment on truck beds or transport trailers can cause equipment to slide off when going around a curve or when turning, especially when traveling at high speeds.

Towing Equipment Too Fast

 

The equipment may start to sway, causing the operator to lose control. Towing implements only with a chain can be extremely hazardous, especially if there is no means to provide tension other than applying brakes.

 

Size of the Machinery

 

Today’s large equipment sometimes overlaps into other lanes, creating a hazardous situation.

 

 

Some Prevention Tips of Road Collisions 

 

  • See and be seen - Clean off windshields and lights. Turn lights on at dusk or in times of poor visibility such as fog, rain, blowing dust, or cloudy conditions.

 

 

  • Before entering the roadway, stop and look both directions.

 

 

  • Make sure you have enough time to cross the road or enter the road if traffic is coming or is close

 

 

  • Be aware of the road conditions. Know where the hazards exist before you start, such hazards include potholes, ditches, washouts, narrow bridges, blind corners, and sharp curves. Look out for road signs. Trying to avoid these may cause you to drive in the other lane. Be aware of traffic in both directions.  

 

 

  • Maintain speeds that are appropriate for the road conditions,

 

 

There is a strict speed limit of 30km for all vehicles on farm!

 

 

Snake Safety 22/02/2017

Snake safety

Snakes will avoid people if they can.But if they feel threatened and cant find a way of escape they will defend themselves by biting. Most people bitten by snakes are bitten when trying to catch it or kill it

 

If you see a Snake...

  • Stay calm and walk away from it
  •  Do NOT try to catch it
  • Do NOT try to kill it Do NOT make it feel threatened e.g throwing things at it / poking it with a stick
  • If you see a snake in a building leave the room

 

First aid tips for Snake bites

 

  • Call for help immediately
  • Do NOT Try to Suck out the poison
  • Do NOT cut the wound
  • Do NOT wash the bite. (the hospital has the best chance of identifying the snake by any venom sill around the wound)
  • Apply a pressure bandage tightly across the bite and up the limb to immobilise it.
  • if the bite is not on a limb, apply direct and firm pressure to the bite site with your hands (it is also important the patient is kept still).
  • Stay as calm and as still as possible while you are waiting to help to come.

 

 

Fast facts    

 

Snakes are deaf, they have no external ears.

 

Snakes can visualise their surroundings using their tongue to pick up chemicals in the air.

 

Snakes are found on every continent except Antarctica.

 

Snakes have no eyelids.

 

Before shedding, a snake’s eyes will become cloudy/opaque

 

Endemic to Western Australia’s Pilbara region, the Anthill python (Antaresia perthensis) is the smallest python species in the world.

 

The yellow bellied sea snake (Pelamis platurus) is the most widely distributed snake in the world, found in tropical oceanic waters across the globe excluding the Atlantic.

 

Mother pythons will coil themselves around their eggs using their bodies to regulate the eggs temperature during incubation

 

There are no snakes native to New Zealand.

 

Most snakes are immune to their own venom.

 

Anti-venom is produced by injecting small amounts of venom into a horse and then extracting the antibodies.

 

The king cobra is the longest venomous snake in the world, and eats other snakes, including other king cobras.

 

The amethystine python (aka the scrub python) is by far the longest snake in Australia, it grows up to 6m.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Be alert! Speed can hurt 28/01/2017

 

Speeding


The simple truth about speeding is: the faster you go, the longer it takes to stop and, if you crash, the harder the impact. Even small increases in speed could have severe consequences. If a pedestrian steps out into the path of an oncoming vehicle which is speeding the difference could be a matter of life or death.

In an emergency, the average driver takes about 1.5 seconds to react. Stopping distances increase exponentially the faster you go.

 

Here at Moonrocks there is A Strict speed limit of 30km/hr applies to all vehicles on farm.

 

About speeding

 

Speeding is one of the major causes of fatalities on Queensland roads. Speeding is defined as driving over the posted speed limit or at a speed that is inappropriate given the driving conditions (e.g. rain, fog, traffic volume, traffic flow).

Most people think that speeding is just driving over the speed limit. Speeding is also driving at a speed that is inappropriate for the driving conditions, such as rain, fog, traffic or traffic flow.

During 2015 there were 62 fatalities as a result of crashes involving speeding drivers or riders.

Speed limits are set and enforced to save lives and reduce crashes. Fines and demerit points  apply when a vehicle is caught driving above the posted speed limit.  

It is not safe to speed in any circumstance.

 

Driving within the speed limit maximises your stopping distance giving you more time to react to:

 

  • the actions of other road users around you like vehicles, pedestrians and cyclists

 

  • changes to the road environment itself such as pot holes and obstacles.

 

Speed-related social costs

 

Speed crashes result in high social costs to the community in the forms of:

 

  • hospital and health care costs

 

  • lost productivity in the workplace

 

  • the cost of using emergency services.

 

Speeding has significant costs to the community each year. Speed-related fatalities and hospitalised casualties in Queensland have an estimated cost of $283 million each year†‡.

 

Driving safety tips to avoid accidents

 

When you’re behind the wheel of a car – whether alone or with passengers – driving safely should always be your top concern. We’re more distracted than ever, so it’s crucial to know the basics of safe driving and practice them every time you’re on the road. Here are some safe driving tips:

 

1. Focus on driving

 

  • Keep 100% of your attention on driving at all times – no multi-tasking. 
     
     
  • Don’t use your phone or any other electronic device while driving. 

 

  • Slow down. Speeding gives you less time to react and increases the severity of an accident. 

 

2. Drive “defensively”

 

  • Be aware of what other drivers around you are doing, and expect the unexpected. 
     
     
  • Assume other motorists will do something crazy, and always be prepared to avoid it. 
     
     
  • Keep a 2-second cushion between you and the car in front of you.
     
  • Make that 4 seconds if the weather is bad. 

 

3. Plan ahead

 

  • Adjust your seat, mirrors and climate controls before putting the car in gear.

 

  • Pull over to eat or drink. It takes only a few minutes.

 

4. Practice safety

 

  • Secure cargo that may move around while the vehicle is in motion. 

 

  • Don’t attempt to retrieve items that fall to the floor. 

 

  • Have items needed within easy reach – such as toll fees, toll cards and garage passes. 

 

  • Always wear your seat belt and drive sober and drug-free.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Working around forklifts 21/01/2017

 

Pedestrian safety - Working around forklifts

 

Each year hundreds of people are seriously injured or even killed while working or standing in the vicinity of forklifts. Even while travelling at very slow speeds, forklifts can potentially crush and severely injure pedestrians, tip over or lose its load.

 Forklift safety is very important and Workers can protect themselves when they are working near forklifts by using their senses and common sense.

 

 Where’s the Forklift?

 

  • You must learn to listen and look for warning signs that indicate a forklift is nearby so you can take steps to avoid the forklift.

 

 

  • You should: sound the horn when approaching intersections, corners, blind spots, other forklifts, and areas with pedestrians.

 

  • Listen for the sound of backup alarms. All our forklifts have a backup alarm that sounds whenever the forklift is moving in reverse.

 

  • Listen for the sounds of the forklift engine. The engines of combustion forklifts will be louder when the forklift is traveling or when the forklift is raising a load. However, because electric forklifts are usually very quiet, listening for engine noise from them will not help.

 

  • Look for flashing lights. All our Forklifts have flashing, rotating lights that operate continuously.

 

 

 Walking Safely near Forklifts

 

 To maintain an awareness of where forklifts are, workers should:

 

 

  • Avoid distractions when walking out where there is forklift traffic, including reading paperwork or talking with other pedestrians.

 

  • Stop and look both ways before entering a forklift lane, crossing an aisle, walking up to a blind corner, or walking across an intersection where forklifts travel.

 

  • Walk single file along the side of an aisle that has forklift traffic, or keep to designated walking aisles.

 


 

 Approaching a Forklift Driver

 

 If a staff member needs to approach a forklift driver to discuss something, he or she should:

 

  • Stay back from the forklift until the driver sees him or her.

 

  • Wait for the driver to stop the forklift.

 

  • Approach the forklift after the driver motions him or her over.

 

 

When approaching the forklift, workers should be careful to:

 

  • Keep their feet away from the forklift.
  • Walk away before the driver moves the forklift, rather than standing next to the forklift and waiting for the driver to pull away.

 

 Forklift drivers

 

Forklift drivers have a duty of care and under the law are lawfully responsible for any accidents caused.  However this does not mean pedestrians have right of way. Pedestrians must follow our forklift safety rules!

 

 

 

Surving another Heat Wave 14/01/2017

 

Another heat wave is upon us

 

Just when we thought this second heat wave was almost over with temperature's dropping to 38 on Sunday and 35 on Monday.

 

Mother nature has decided we haven't had enough hot summer weather yet and next week will see temperatures sore to the mid 40's again.

 

We cannot STRESS enough the importance of how important it is to be prepared for hot weather.

 

Heat Exhaustion

 

Extreme heat can make existing medical conditions worse and cause a heat – related illness, which may be fatal.  The most important things to remember are:

 

  • Keep cool

 

  • Drink plenty of water, Always make sure you have a minimum of 2L of water on you at all times and make sure you have spare water filled and in the fridge.

 

  • Stay out of the sun ( if you must go into the sun make sure you have sunscreen on with a minimum SPF of 30 and you have a hat on)

 

  • Look after yourself and others

 

 

Who is most at risk?

 

People most at risk during extreme heat events are:

 

  • People aged over 65 years, especially those living alone

 

  • People who have a medical condition such as diabetes, kidney disease or mental illness

 

  • People taking medications that may affect the way the body reacts to heat

 

  • People with problematic alcohol or other drug use

 

  • People with a disability who may not be able to identify or communicate their discomfort or thirst

 

  • People who are overweight or obese

 

  • People who work or are physically active outdoors

 

Preparing for hot weather

 

  • Check that your fan or air-conditioner works well

 

  • Stock up on food, water and medication to avoid having to go out in the heat

 

Preparing for power failure

 

It is very common to lose power during extreme heat events.

You can be prepared by:

 

  • Thinking about how you would cope without power

 

  • Ensure you have a torch, a fully charged mobile phone or a telephone that will work without electricity, a battery operated radio and sufficient batteries

 

  • Ensure you have frozen blocks / water bottles

 

Coping with the heat

 

  • Look after yourself and keep in touch with sick or frail family, friends and neighbours

 

  • Drink plenty of water, even if you don’t feel thirsty

 

  • Keep yourself cool by using wet towels, putting your feet in cool water and taking cool (not cold) showers

 

  • Stay out of the sun during the hottest part of the day

 

  • If you must go out, wear light coloured, loose fitting clothing and a hat

 

  • Eat smaller meals more often and cold meals such as salads. Make sure you store refrigerated food properly and discard if it has been out of adequate temperature control for more than 4 hours.

 

  • Watch or listen to news reports that provide more information during a heatwave

 

It is likely that extreme heat events will occur in conjunction with severe, extreme and Code Red Fire Danger days.  Always remain up to date with Fire Warnings for your local area and act in accordance with your Fire Ready Plan.

 

Heat related illness

 

Extreme heat may cause illness such as heat cramps, heat exhaustion and heat stroke.  It may also worsen pre-existing conditions such as heart disease or diabetes.

 

Heat Cramps

 

  • Muscle pains

 

  • Spasms in the abdomen, arms or legs

 

Heat Exhaustion

 

  • Pale complexion and sweating

 

  • Rapid heart rate

 

  • Muscle cramps and weakness

 

  • Dizziness and headaches

 

  • Nausea and vomiting

 

  • Fainting

 

Heat Stroke (A Life Threatening Emergency – Call 000)

 

  • Similar symptoms to heat exhaustion

 

  • Dry skin with no sweating

 

  • Mental condition worsens and causes confusion

 

  • Seizure

 

  • Stroke-like symptoms or collapsing

 

  • Unconsciousness

 

Medical Contact Information

 

For 24 hour health advice contact NURSE ON CALL 1300 60 60 24

For life threatening emergencies 000

Heat Stress 05/01/2017

Heat Wave

 

St George is set to have another Heat Wave next Week with the following Days set to Sore

 

Sunday 35 degrees

 

Monday 36 degrees

 

Tuesday 39 degrees

 

Wednesday 41 degrees

 

 Remember

 

  • When it is very hot, you may be at increased risk of heat stress.

 

Symptoms of heat-related illness

 

It is important to know the signs and symptoms of heat exposure and how you should respond. Symptoms vary according to the type of heat-related illness.

Some heat-related illness and common symptoms include:

 

  • Deterioration in existing medical conditions – this is the most common health problem of heat stress.

  • Heat rash – sometimes called ‘prickly heat’, this is a skin irritation caused by excessive sweating. It can occur at any age, but is most common in young children. It looks like a red cluster of pimples or small blisters. It is most likely to occur on the neck and upper chest, in the groin, under the breasts and in the elbow creases.

  • Heat cramps – these include muscle pains or spasms, usually in the abdomen, arms or legs. They may occur after strenuous activity in a hot environment, when the body gets depleted of salt and water. They may also be a symptom of heat exhaustion.

  • Dizziness and fainting – heat-related dizziness and fainting results from reduced blood flow to the brain. Heat causes an increase in blood flow to the skin and pooling of blood in the legs, which can lead to a sudden drop in blood pressure. There can be a feeling of light-headedness before fainting occurs.

  • Heat exhaustion – this is a serious condition that can develop into heatstroke. It occurs when excessive sweating in a hot environment reduces the blood volume. Warning signs may include paleness and sweating, rapid heart rate, muscle cramps (usually in the abdomen, arms or legs), headache, nausea and vomiting, dizziness or fainting.

 

Heatstroke – this is a medical emergency and requires urgent attention. Heatstroke occurs when the core body temperature rises above 40.5 °C and the body’s internal systems start to shut down. Many organs in the body suffer damage and the body temperature must be reduced quickly. Most people will have profound central nervous system changes such as delirium, coma and seizures. The person may stagger, appear confused, have a fit or collapse and become unconscious. As well as effects on the nervous system, there can be liver, kidney, muscle and heart damage

 

 

 

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